Tag Archives: self

Being Here Now

Years of practice and I can still only do what I’m doing while I’m doing it.

Writing this post thinking about walking bootless dogs, getting the towels out of the dryer and mourning the loss of bagels … must be the gluten … seriously they could have come up with a better word.

Could have listened to Ram Dass, in eighth grade, when he wrote … “Now is now. Are you going to be here or not?”

Being in a moment is an interesting place and from what I can tell, while I’m in and out of consciousness, it’s very relaxing, it doesn’t cost anything to get in, it’s really quiet and the doors never close.  

aha moments
Syracuse, NY Sidewalk A-ha Moment © Mara Lee
Insert Favorite Quotes by Ram Dass here - have a different moment I have to get to.  :)-

“The quieter you become, the more you can hear.” ― Ram Dass

In most of our human relationships, we spend much of our time reassuring one another that our costumes of identity are on straight.” ― Ram Dass

“We’re fascinated by the words–but where we meet is in the silence behind them.”  ― Ram Dass

“Spiritual practices help us move from identifying with the ego to identifying with the soul. Old age does that for you too. It spiritualizes people naturally.”  ― Ram Dass

“It is important to expect nothing, to take every experience, including the negative ones, as merely steps on the path, and to proceed.” ― Ram Dass

“The most exquisite paradox… as soon as you give it all up, you can have it all. As long as you want power, you can’t have it. The minute you don’t want power, you’ll have more than you ever dreamed possible.” ― Ram Dass

“As long as you have certain desires about how it ought to be you can’t see how it is.” ― Ram Dass

“A feeling of aversion or attachment toward something is your clue that there’s work to be done.”  ― Ram Dass

“It is important to expect nothing, to take every experience, including the negative ones, as merely steps on the path, and to proceed.” – Ram Dass

and a personal favorite … “Everything changes once we identify with being the witness to the story, instead of the actor in it.” ― Ram Dass

howdy do
we’re here! – grand canyon

Moments Matter Thursday

Advertisements

Launching your creative life…

circular file
Ideas are like wandering sons. They show up when you least expect them. ~Bern Williams

In a wonderful  book entitled Creative Authenticity, artist Ian Roberts argues that at some point you just have to jump in, fears and all. There is something courageous about it. The really tricky part is finding what you want to say.

“Ultimately, it doesn’t matter to the world whether you paint, dance or write,” says Roberts. “The world will probably get by without the product of your efforts. But that’s not the point. The point is what the inner process of following your creative impulses will do to you. It is clearly about process. Love the work, love the process.

Robert’s principles essential for creative authenticity:

  • Searching for beauty. Beauty is something that seizes your attention, stops you in your tracks, silences you. It can be the way light filters through the trees in your backyard or the magnificence of a fifteenth century Italian painting. The subject is irrelevant; it is only a vehicle for your attention, to engage the intensity of your feelings. That intensity is what viewers ultimately respond to.
  • Communication. Creativity fundamentally involves expressive power; it is the catching of the “gleams of light” that flash across our mind and forming that vision into something.
  • Your home turf. It could be a garden. Or a studio. But you need a creative home base that always stays open for your arrival and bestows on you a readiness to begin your work.
  • The Van Gogh syndrome. Don’t buy into the myth that creativity is the province of tortured geniuses.
  • Your craft, your voice. Practice, practice, practice your craft. It gives you fluency in the creative process and in technique. It’s technique that gives life to your creative ideas. Learning your craft opens the channel for your voice to flow.
  • Showing up. “Nothing determines your creative life more than doing it,” says Roberts.
  • The dance of avoidance. Starting is always a psychologically messy process, because there are no rules surrounding what you want to do. Setting up a dedicated space for the practice of your craft helps you shift gears directly into your creative process.
  • Full-time or part-time. You can’t expect to fly consistently at a high level of inspiration.
  • Follow something along. If you are going to say something authentic, you need to stick with an idea for a while, an idea that has personal resonance.
  • Wagon train and scout. Creativity involves the interplay between where you are and where you see yourself going to keep your expression growing. Always be on the lookout for new paths, and observe how others solve the problems you face.
  • Working method. Creativity is in the process, not in the finished results.
  • Limits yield intensity. Unrestrained freedom is a myth, and it’s not productive.
  • Being ready to show. Don’t spend your time marketing your creations. If you spend it creating, you are investing your work with the authenticity that will draw others to your efforts..
  • You are more than creative enough. The question is not whether you are creative enough but whether you will free yourself to express it.
  • Finding poetry in the everyday. Develop the power to see the ordinary as poetic.
  • Holding the big picture. Always keep a sense of the whole. That commits you to making the moves that will ultimately represent what you see.

“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.- Shunryo Suzuki-Roshi