Come To Your Senses

“Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions. You change direction but the sandstorm chases you. You turn again, but the storm adjusts. Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn. Why? Because this storm isn’t something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you. This storm is you. Something inside of you. So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn’t get in, and walk through it, step by step. There’s no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time. Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones. That’s the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine.

And you really will have to make it through that violent, metaphysical, symbolic storm.  No matter how metaphysical or symbolic it might be, make no mistake about it: it will cut through flesh like a thousand razor blades. People will bleed there, and you will bleed too. Hot, red blood. You’ll catch that blood in your hands, your own blood and the blood of others.

And once the storm is over you won’t remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won’t even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over. But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.” ― Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Bathroom Sinks

Didn’t have a ton of time to pick out the bungalow bathroom sink and thought I hit pay dirt with this one.

Win some, lose some … when you install a footed vanity or have a bottom shelf that hugs the bathroom floor – right next to the toilet – cleaning is impossible, especially under a vanity … and how does an open shelf get that filthy one day to the next?  Beyond disgusting. Pass, this will not stand, man.

Think pedestal sink, built-in vanity (minus the feet) or a wall hung sink for extra freshness. The end.

Kitchen Renovation

Long before the demolition, HVAC, electrical, plumbing, lumber, drywall and a few dumpster loads …

  1.  Create a renovation notebook, do a rough sketch of the room and measure the space … twice. Write it down.
  2. Pick out the kitchen appliances, microwave, vent hood, sink, faucet, lighting and where the garbage goes, to start planning the kitchen design.
  3. High profile kitchen faucets might look good but they splash everywhere. Going to replace mine with a medium to low profile kitchen faucet instead.
  4.  Buy the big fridge.
  5.  Think double oven.
  6.  Buy a dishwasher with a stainless interior.
  7.  Open kitchen shelves (love+hate) and open storage on top of the cupboards is tough to keep clean. The open shelves I can live with but design your kitchen cupboards so they go all the way up to the ceiling and you’ll never have to clean up there again.
  8. Slab (flat front) cupboards are easier to maintain, look amazing and may prove to be cheaper.
  9.  Design deep drawers for base cupboards, instead of cupboards with adjustable shelves.
  10.  The big box stores offer kitchen design services that will give you a baseline of where your budget can take you in a full retail environment. If a box store meets your expectations great … expect to pay more for the convenience and resources.
  11. Can’t afford the box stores? Be the contractor or find one with a list of go-to plumbers, electricians, painters, sheet-rockers and cabinetmakers.
  12. Promise yourself that you’ll paint the new walls, windows and doors before you install everything else. ( I prefer flat paint on ceilings and satin paint for the walls, woodwork and doors but … the painter thought otherwise.) The End.

gathered & glued

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